The Pelican Flower is a Central American vine with huge flowers that bloom for just two days before they wilt and die.

The first day is spent using the stench of death and decay to attract flies which get trapped overnight within the depths of the flower. They’re only let out the next day, after a dowsing of pollen, so they can get trapped by a whole new flower and pollinate it in the process.

Pelican Flowers get their name from looking a bit like a pelican from the side. I guess Malevolent Alien Chrysalis Flower didn’t catch on.

…Images: dl7tny/Cary Bass/Kew on Flickr/Brian Chiu/Brian Henderson

cephalopodqueen

koryos:

arsanatomica:

The skull of the Chinese Water Deer is one of the most iconic skulls out there. 

Like many small Asian deer species, it does not have antlers. Instead the males fight each other with their extremely sharp tusks, slashing at rivals with downward head swings. 

When not actively shanking others, the tusks can be folded back slightly., so they don’t interfere with eating. 

I wrote a short post on how and why these tusks evolved!

endangereduglythings

endangereduglythings:

stuckinabucket:

The Caribbean roughshark (Oxynotus caribbaeus) lives in the Caribbean.  It’s less than two feet long, lives at depths of greater than 1,000 feet, and looks a bit like a pig from various angles.  It probably feeds on invertebrates, but we’re hard-pressed to say for sure because seriously, more than a thousand feet down.  These pictures were taken by fucking submarines, guys.

They’re also ovoviviparous, which is an end-run around not being able to grow a placenta.  They keep their eggs in their little stubby shark bodies until they’re ready to hatch, at which point the pups are birthed and sent off to roam.

A triangular shark? What?

Though I guess that might help for scooting along the bottom…

endangereduglythings
endangereduglythings:

If anyone wonders what my Tumblr avatar is, here’s your answer. This is the Ohio Lamprey. Like most lampreys (but not all), it spends the majority of its adult life oral-disc deep in the side of some fish.
But, after two years of giving the world’s worst hickies, the lampreys swim away to find a nice, clear, quiet stream. There, the males and females work together to make a small depression in the stream bed. With no hands—or for that matter, proper fins—they use their suction-cup like mouths to do the heavy lifting. They then mate, lay their eggs, and die. The babies are toothless, instead choosing to burrow tail-down in the stream to filter out particles for the next four years.
These cuties are getting harder to find, as dams restrict their movement, and silt in streams clogs the juviniles’ filter-feeding gills.

endangereduglythings:

If anyone wonders what my Tumblr avatar is, here’s your answer. This is the Ohio Lamprey. Like most lampreys (but not all), it spends the majority of its adult life oral-disc deep in the side of some fish.

But, after two years of giving the world’s worst hickies, the lampreys swim away to find a nice, clear, quiet stream. There, the males and females work together to make a small depression in the stream bed. With no hands—or for that matter, proper fins—they use their suction-cup like mouths to do the heavy lifting. They then mate, lay their eggs, and die. The babies are toothless, instead choosing to burrow tail-down in the stream to filter out particles for the next four years.

These cuties are getting harder to find, as dams restrict their movement, and silt in streams clogs the juviniles’ filter-feeding gills.

The Dancing White Lady is a great, big spider from the Namib Desert in southern Africa.

They spend their days hidden in underground burrows and emerge at night to hunt for insects and lizards which they find by detecting the vibrations of footsteps.

These hunting expeditions occur within a short range of the burrow entrance, but males can travel over 100 metres in search of a mate.

He communicates with the female via the timeless medium of dance. Tapping the ground outside her burrow sends down vibrations that ask her to come out, but not eat him. She doesn’t always oblige…

…Images: James Anderson

cephalopodqueen

libutron:

Northern Spiny Tail Gecko

These hypnotic eyes belong to the Northern Spiny Tail Gecko, Strophurus ciliaris aberrans (Gekkonidae), a large gecko (up to 15cm long), endemic to western Australia. 

As suggested by their common and scientific names, these geckos have two rows of large spines down the upper surface of the tail, and a row of small spines above the eye. In fact, Strophurus means ‘turning-tail’, and ciliaris ‘eyelashed’, in reference to the spines above the eyes.

When molested, this gecko exudes a noxious sticky fluid from the glands in its tail.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos | [Top] - [Bottom]

Locality: Gascoyne, Western Australia